Categories

Blog powered by Typepad

« How do you solve a problem like the Lords? | Main | The School of Saint Monday »

Friday, October 27, 2006

Comments

Mike Bennett

Hi I'd be interested in what's happening with the Corporations and the Democrats? Even more than here business is a major force in US politics and my view is that we now have two "business" parties in this country.

Are both parties corporatised in the US or are the Democrats prepared to stand up to business?

Richard Phillips

sorry to put you on the spot, James, but you say the Dems are likely to fall just short of picking up the senate. can you give us a quick summary of the party's chances in the key battleground senatorial races?

Ashton McGregor

James

Your last paragraph is the key issue. Pelosi (and to a degree Reid) has managed to get some discipline instilled into the House Democrats but they don't yet present an alternative to conservatism on their terms - they are coasting on anti-incumbent sentiment much in the way that Cameron is here. It is difficult to see how that position will change beyond the mid-terms. There is not clear position for the disparate Democrat strands to coalesce around in my view. Quite how the cultural conservatives and triangulators in the Party can form a sensible platform together with the liberals is beyond me.

James Crabtree

Right. Good points, both of those. I'll post on them shortly. The issue of corporations is completely fascinating, as are the Senate races in Tennessee and Virginia. So, yes, ill do the for sure. Anyone for anything else?

James Crabtree

Right. Good points, both of those. I'll post on them shortly. The issue of corporations is completely fascinating, as are the Senate races in Tennessee and Virginia. So, yes, ill do the for sure. Anyone for anything else?

James Crabtree

Ashton - I think that’s right –and perceptive. This is clearly a GOP loss, not a Dem gain. There is some truth to the argument that Pelosi would make – when someone is running towards the cliff edge, get out of their way. Her strategy was the same on Social Security – her answer to the question of when there would be a democratic plan was “how about never?” so, yes, there are concerns about what comes next. I think I’d be more concerned about the Dems than Cameron, for instance. Cameron has more substance, and more agency. I’ll try to address that in a post.

David Brede

You say that the Republicans are one cycle ahead in their turnout operations. As this will be a key issue in 2009 if not before in the UK, is this a sheer hard work issue or something other than that?

James Crabtree

David - no, sadly, its much worse that that. Technologically they are a long way ahead, and they also have gotten better at traditional “knocking up” style GOTV, now known as the 72 hour campaign. Put simply – they have been doing this since 2002, and we are only just starting. Hence, 1 cycle. And the implications are just fascinating for progressives. If you can, in a sense, make new Republicans it means you completely undermine the calculus of electoral politics. You no longer have to run the centre. Which is just what they do – win by being extreme. I’ll write about it a little on a subsequent post.

Richard Phillips

James - it seems that there's been a slight up-tick in George Bush's approval ratings. Is this - combined with the GOP's negative blitz and fundraising advantage an indication that the Democrats may have peaked too early?

James Crabtree

Richard - can you send me that polling data? I haven't read today's papers yet, but i haven't seen any evidence of a GOP comeback since Foley, beyond what one might think of as a dead cat bounce comeback.

The comments to this entry are closed.