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Tuesday, November 28, 2006

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Tom

I agree to a point.

But I'd also say that Westminster is probably even more guilty of the village mentality than the BBC.

Think of the endless justifications the BBC is having to make in appealing for (probably modest) licence fee increases.

Of course, this is completely necessary in accounting for taxpayers' money. But who are MPs accountable to when voting for large expenses and pay increases?

If you say 'the voters, of course!' you are wrong - until you can produce a single elected politician who has stood on a platform of denying themselves pay and expenses increases.

Gregg

I could understand if it was the Director General who'd quit. That would be a real blow to the BBC that could potentially change how the corporation operates, might suggest the corporation was in trouble, and might even cause problems for the license renegotiation; and so, would affect virtually everyone in the UK and would indeed be a major news story. But Chairman of the Beeb's Board of Governors is a non-executive position, not closely involved in the running of the BBC (which is probably why Grade has jumped ship). Still, Grade's switch is very important for ITV - can he save the ailing commercial broadcaster, and does this appointment royally shaft Murdoch's ambitions?

Gregg

If you say 'the voters, of course!' you are wrong - until you can produce a single elected politician who has stood on a platform of denying themselves pay and expenses increases.

The SSP in the last two Scottish Parliamentary elections. A number of left Labour MPs also used to do this - pledging to only accept pay in line with the average national salary.

Tom

Cheers Gregg. Exceptions that prove the rule, clearly.

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